January 28, 2011

Benjamin Grosvenor (1675–1758) on the Good-Will of God

"I. What this Good Will of God is [in Deut. 33:16]?
And it signifies not only that Benevolence of God, whereby he wills Good to all his Creatures, not willing that any should perish, but should come to the Knowledge of the Truth, and be saved: Not only his common Beneficence, whereby he does good to all, and his tender Mercies are over all his Works; causing his Sun to shine and his Rain to fall upon the Just and the Unjust: And with a liberal Hand scatters promiscuous Bounties over the World, which are pick'd up by wicked Men as Dogs do Crumbs under their Masters Table: But the good Will of God here [in Deut. 33:16] must be understood to signify something more Excellent..."
Benjamin Grosvenor, God's Good Will to Great-Britain (London: Printed for Eman. Matthews, at the Bible in Pater-Noster-Row; and R. Ford, at the Angel in the Poultrey, 1720), 9–10. Also in Sermons by Benjamin Grosvenor (Isle of Wight: Printed for the Author, by R. Tillin, Newport; and Sold by Williams and Smith, Stationer's-Court, and Ogle, Holborn, London, 1808), 183.

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William Williams (1685–1741) on the Nature of the Faith Which Justifies

"That Faith which justifies a sinner is not merely an assent to a Proposition, but is an act of the will, as well as of the understanding, whereby a sensible and law-condemned sinner, convinced of the truth of the Gospel, and of the sufficiency of Christ to answer the necessities of his Soul, accepts the offer of him that God makes, consents to take him as a complete Saviour, entirely depends and relies upon him for Righteousness, Grace and Life. This Faith is God's Gift, Eph. 2.8. and the effect of the Father's drawing, Joh. 6.44."
William Williams, The Great Salvation Revealed and Offered in the Gospel Explained and an Hearty Acceptance of it Urged (Boston: Printed by T. Crump, for S. Gerrish, and D. Henchman, & Sold at their Shops, 1717), 52–53.

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Annals of the American Pulpit

January 25, 2011

William Williams (1685–1741) on the Nature of God's Gospel Offer

"God in the Gospel not only declares that there is Salvation to be had, that it is a thing attainable, but he invites one and another to put in for a share: in a feeling sense of their misery, to accept the remedy that is offered: under the sense of their Soul Sickness and Distempers to apply themselves to a Soul Physician. It shews that it is not presumption for them but their duty to do so: yea God doth not barely propose it but backs the proposal with most proper and pressing arguments, such as in themselves are suited to work upon the hearts of Men from the Excellency of the blessing itself; and from the danger and misery that Sinners will bring upon themselves, by the refusal: by which God's serious regard to Man's welfare is plainly discovered."
William Williams, The Great Salvation Revealed and Offered in the Gospel Explained and an Hearty Acceptance of it Urged (Boston: Printed by T. Crump, for S. Gerrish, and D. Henchman, & Sold at their Shops, 1717), 50. This work has a preface by the presbyterian Benjamin Colman.

"The Gospel doth not barely bring a report to us, that Salvation is attainable, but it is a Doctrine propounded in God's name, clothed with his Authority, and accompanied with his Presence, so far (as to some at least) that it becomes effectual to convey the priviledges purchased by Christ and contained in it." Ibid., 55.

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