September 10, 2005

Magic Glasses

Arthur Pink's The Sovereignty of God -- $6.37

John Owen's The Death of Death -- $13.58

A pair of High Calvinist Magic Glasses...

PRICELESS!!!

6 comments:

Steve Costley said...

LOL. Notice how THICK the glass is in those things. It really helps; I know. The texts do look different with the magic glasses off.

Nomosian said...

do those magic glasses also substitute for attracting women?

YnottonY said...

do those magic glasses also substitute for attracting women?

The glasses will attract those women who look at you through a one decretal eyeball. These are female cyclopses, so I am not sure if you want them to be attacted to you LOL.

They may look like THIS.

Steve Costley said...

Also notice that the little "equals" sign looks like tape.

Rose~ said...

I read your post and I must admit, you talk way over my head! But this...this... I can understand! (even though I think, from reading your other thoughts that you are a 5 pointer, but somehow I think you recognize that all menas all and the world doesn't mean the "world of the elect" ... these glasses are irritating)

YnottonY said...

Hi Rose,

Even though the high Calvinists are wrong to try and get an elect sense when "all" or "world" is used in various passages, the non-Calvinists need to be careful to not make those terms mean everyone who has ever lived or shall live. All means all, but it usually has the sense of every kind of person, whether elect or not, whether Jew or Gentile, in a particular context. The High Calvinist linguistic trick of trying to posit that "all without exception" is contrary to "all without distinction" is unsustainable. All without distinction can include all without exception in certain contexts. Incidently, the high Calvinists don't really mean "all without distinction" when they use that expression. What they really mean is "some of all without distinction," i.e. the elect from among all without distinction. That's a subtle leap in logic that often goes undetected.