November 29, 2009

More Wonderful Paradoxes in Augustine

"But our very Life descended hither, and bore our death, and slew it, out of the abundance of His own life; and thundering He called loudly to us to return hence to Him into that secret place whence He came forth to us–first into the Virgin's womb, where the human creature was married to Him,–our mortal flesh, that it might not be for ever mortal,–and thence "as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber, rejoicing as a strong man to run a race." For He tarried not, but ran crying out by words, deeds, death, life, descent, ascension, crying aloud to us to return to Him. And He departed from our sight, that we might return to our heart, and there find Him. For He departed, and behold, He is here. He would not be long with us, yet left us not; for He departed thither, whence He never departed, because "the world was made by Him."
Augustine, "The Confessions of St. Augustine," NPNF, 1st series, ed. Philip Schaff (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2004), 1:74.

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